TANCon2009 - December 2009 - Virgin Territories: A New Market for Innovative Investment
The African Network
Speakers

DEVELOPING VENTURE CAPITAL AND PRIVATE EQUITY IN POST-CONFLICT COUNTRIES

Post-Conflict African countries such as Sierra Leone are among the fastest growing countries on the continent. What challenges are unique to developing private equity in Post-Conflict Countries? What type of financing is appropriate for which type of activity? How can governments create an enabling environment for VC's and private equity?


RENEWABLE ENERGY: THE POTENTIAL FOR AFRICA

A nighttime view of the African continent from space is a clear pronouncement of the lack of access to electricity which cripples necessary economic growth. Yet Africa boasts of numerous sources of renewable energy such as the sun, wind, rain, tides, geo-thermal heat, bio fuel, biomass and nearly a billion potential consumers to pay for such services. However, development of renewable energy requires vast financial, policy, technical, and social resources that seem lacking. How can Africa unleash the promise of renewable energy in order to foster the growth required for the continent? What role does the trading of carbon credits play in the development of renewable energy? Which policies/incentives aid in the development of renewable energy?


SIERRA LEONE: AN INVESTMENT DESTINATION

The panel seeks to showcase Sierra Leone as an investment destination. It shall involve discussion on: Why choose Sierra Leone as your investment destination? What are some of the legal and regulatory reforms that are taking place? How is the process of privatization of government owned enterprises being actualized?

  • Beatrice Chaytor, Managing Director, The Elenchus Institute
  • Oluniyi Robbin-Coker, Private Sector Advisor, State House
  • Patrick Caulker, Chief Executive Officer, SLIEPA
  • Yvonne Aki-Sawyer, Investment Promotions and Marketing Director, Mape Project
  • Abu Bangura, Commissioner, National Privatization Commission
  • Charles Veach, CEO, World Health Alliance International Inc.
  • Moderator: Chukwu-Emeka Chikezie

HOW AFRICA CAN FEED ITSELF AND THE WORLD

A majority of Africans on the continent today, make their living from Agriculture. Yet, agricultural output falls far short of domestic requirements in most African countries. Most countries, Sierra Leone included import their staples. Nonetheless, Africa has the potential to feed itself and the world. How does Africa overcome the challenges of a highly fragmented industry, limited access to markets, insufficient water, lack of knowledge of modern techniques and more? What role does government policy play? How does consolidation of the market take place? What lessons can a virgin territory, such as Sierra Leone learn from other developing countries, and other more successful industries?

  • Ariff Shamji, Chief Executive Officer AAA Growers
  • Dr. Ramadjita Tabo, Deputy Executive Director, FARA
  • Mahmoud Idriss, Chief Executive Officer of ITASCAP Limited
  • Shaid Koroma, Managing Director, Marika
  • Michael A. T. Kalainkay, Agricultural Marketing Advisor of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security
  • Moderator: Mohamed Hersi

DEVELOPING AN AFRICAN TOURISM BRAND

Africa tends to be in the international media mainly in relation to poverty, civil strife and poor governance. Despite the bad news, countries like post genocide Rwanda and South Africa (with high domestic crime rate) experience some of the highest tourism receipts on the continent. This panel shall explore: Why is Africa, Sierra Leone in particular, portrayed this way? How does a country improve its national brand image? Which stakeholders are responsible for making their national brand competitive? How do you measure success, when brands are intangible? What is the role of the media in creating national brands?


INFRASTRUCTURE: A CATALYST FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Development experts typically state that Investment in Infrastructure is the required catalyst for economic prosperity. Yet, private financing firms tend to shy away from certain (roads, bridges, power) infrastructure related investments. What sort of regulatory or policy changes are required to create an enabling environment for infrastructure related investments? What role do debt and equity investors find themselves playing? What are the windows of opportunities in physical infrastructure, transportation and power? Do the financial returns make these investments viable?

  • Jerome Okolo, Executive Vice Chairman, GeoQinetiq Limited
  • Omar Arouna, Managing Director-Washington D.C., GoodWorks International
  • David Awuah-Darko, Founder and CEO of the IC Securities group
  • Manilius Garber, Senior Partner, Jarrett, Yaskey, Garber and Associates
  • Victor E. Williams, Co-head Wells Fargo Securities’ Technology, Media & Telecom M&A practice
  • Ikechukwu Nnamani, President/Chief Executive Office, Medallion Communications Limited
  • Moderator: Adrian Labor

THE ROLE OF ICT IN INCREASING PRODUCTIVITY AND FOSTERING GROWTH

Africans pay among the highest rates to access the internet and a majority of the time this access is not reliable. Access to information is a key impetus to economic, political and social growth. This panel seeks to answer: What is required to get access rates down and reliable on the continent? What is required to increase productivity and usage among Africans? What role does the government play in creating a knowledge economy? What is required for the development of African content and applications? What are the emerging business opportunities in ICT that are unique to Africa? How is convergence affecting productivity?


GOVERNMENT ROLE IN FOSTERING ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Entrepreneurship is an important engine of growth. Government policy, in turn, shapes the institutional environment in which entrepreneurial decisions are made. Thus, government policy is important for entrepreneurship. But what policies are more conducive to productive entrepreneurship? In spite of a significant amount of work on this and related topics, there is still much we do not know about this important relationship. After reviewing recent literature on entrepreneurship policy, this paper summarizes the contributions included in this volume and puts them in the context of the ongoing research debate. The goal of the special issue is to address important unanswered questions and trigger a constructive debate among diverging views.


TURNING THE RESOURCE CURSE AROUND

Natural Resources are the main export earners of many African Countries yet the benefits of these receipts have not generated sufficient returns for all segments of society. For most African countries, natural resources have resulted in conflict and are deemed a curse. This panel seeks to learn how to make natural resources more of a blessing by answering the following questions: What are the key regulatory bottlenecks that discourage private sector participation? What role can artisanal mining play in spreading the mineral wealth? How can private companies through CRS measure preserve the public interest? What issues create conflict with government and local communities? How can the percentage of value addition be increased in producing countries?

  • John Sisay, Chief Executive Officer, Titanium Resources
  • London Mining (invited)
  • African Minerals (invited)
  • Moderator: Beatrice Chaytor

CREATING WEALTH AND SOCIAL IMPACT

Social entrepreneurs target the triple bottom line: Financial, social and environmental returns/impact. These social entrepreneurs are finding success in Africa in education, microfinance, housing and many other business opportunities. This panel seeks to learn: How does Social Entrepreneurship differ from Entrepreneurship? What drives the models? What metrics measure success? Where do they access capital? Who benefits from social ventures? What approaches create successful social entrepreneurship ventures? How do exits occur?